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Cambodia at a Crossroads: New Laws Would Limit Freedoms

Set against a background of endemic corruption, unsustainably low wages and impoverishing confiscations of land, Cambodia is considering a series of laws that will severely restrict human rights and the activities of civil society organisations working on these issues.
 
That's the conclusion of an international delegation - including GCAP - which just visited Cambodia, at the invitation of our national coalition there, to highlight the shrinking space for civic expression and individual freedoms. Read on for the media release and our recommendations as well as French, Spanish and Portuguese translations.
 

Left to Right:  Soeung Saroeun (CCC), Tor Hodenfield (CIVICUS), Kwak Nohyun (Forum Asia), Michael Switow (GCAP), Sarah Enees (IFP), Consuelo Katrina A. Lopa (ADN)

iMove events in Asia: Cambodia, India, Korea and Philippines

To mark the 500 day deadline to meet the Millennium Development Goals and adopt a new global Post-2015 agenda, GCAP constituents across Asia gathered in person and online to launch 'iMove for Justice, Peace and Equality', a campaign demanding that leaders at all levels uphold human rights and implement policies that are just, sustainable and transformative.  (Read on to see photos and media coverage.)
 
In the Philippines, a coalition of civil society organisations highlighted the widening wealth gap amidst growing numbers of landless, homeless, malnourished, uneducated, unemployed and sick people in the country.  
 
Youth Ki Awaaz anchored a 12-hour tweet-a-thon in India, 90 minutes focused on each MDG.

Post-2015 Cambodia: A Call for Meaningful Civil Society Participation

Like many countries within the GCAP network, there's a sense in Cambodia that the government is happy to collaborate with civil society when it provides humanitarian assistance and direct services (which are actually the government's responsibility). But when it comes to advocating for new policies, standing up for human rights or playing a watchdog role, it's a different story.

CSOs working in these areas are often "intimidated, warned and even attached with opposition parties and criminal cases," according to one Cambodian activist.  (Read more about GCAP Cambodia's work on this issue.)

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