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The High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF)

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The High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) ended last Wednesday (20.07.16) after eight days. The last three days was the ministerial part where 22 countries persented their national reviews.

Open letter to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker

SDG Watch Europe, an alliance of 70 organisations including GCAP, the Environmental Bureau (EEB) and Plan International, has today (6 June) written to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker calling for him to adopt, as a matter of urgency, an overarching strategy to guide implementation of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda.

Plese find the text of the letter below. The full letter with all signatories can be downloaded here.

Dear President Juncker,

The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in September 2015 was a major global achievement and the EU can rightly be proud of the part it played. SDG Watch Europe – a new, European cross-ectoral civil society alliance set up to monitor the implementation of the Agenda - was glad to see a commitment to implement the 2030 Agenda included in the 2016 Commission Work Programme, entitled

‘No Time for Business as Usual’.

Europe must lead by example and truly move beyond ‘business as usual’ if it is to respond to the 2030 Agenda’s call for transformative change. To do so, the EU must boldly and coherently implement the whole 2030 Agenda – both internally and externally. However, it is now almost a year since the 2030 Agenda was agreed and there has been extremely little progress at EU level. We note that the external dimension of implementation is beginning to move forward through the work of Commissioner Mimica and HRVP Mogherini.

How did EU policies affect the poorest

Voices of the Marginalized

As world leaders have endorsed a Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - and largely declared its predecessor, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), to be a success - it's imperative to understand the extent to which the MDGs did and did not eradicate poverty in the Global South.

A frank assessment of the past fifteen years, based on grassroots analysis and inputs from the most vulnerable and marginalised communities is essential if the world is going to be able to realise the

SDGs and truly ensure a Life of Dignity for All. The Millennium Development Goals established eight interlinked concrete time-bound targets to

halve extreme poverty by 2015 and eradicate it by 2025; however, latter target was dropped along the way. The Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) mobilized hundreds of millions of people across the globe to demand accountability from their governments, declaring that governments must “keep their promises” to achieve and exceed the MDGs.

The new GCAP strategy and governance documents and a letter from your Co- Chairs

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Dear GCAP National Coalitions, 
Dear GCAP Constituancy groups,
Dear friends,

Vice - President Timmermans RE: 2030 AGENDA

To the attention of: First Vice President Frans Timmermans

This response by civil society organisations to First Vice President Frans Timmermans is supporeted by EU based networks and organisations working in areas such as environment, development, accountability, governance, equality, culture, public health, poverty eradication, social inclusion, human rights, agriculture, animal rights, policy coherence for sustainable development, global economic justice, global citizenship education, life long learning, youth etc.

Click here to read the letter:

 

Climate Change Is Already Here: A Letter From Kampala

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Dear Pope Francis,

Kampala is abuzz. Thank you for visiting Uganda! The presidential election season is underway and we have been busy sprucing up the city ahead of your trip here ten days ago. The city's residents have been conducting charity walks, renovating and buying commemorative rosaries from Rome. Workers are re-roofing The Martyr's Shrine, building a new arena and have put the finishing touches on an exhibition hall honouring Christian martyrs who were executed by the king in the late 1800s.

Your visit to Uganda, just before the COP21 climate negotiations started in Paris, came at a crucial time, though, both for our country and the world. You see, the dangerous impacts of climate change have already hit Uganda.

In the northern part of the country, a drought hurt farmers again this year, devastating harvests and creating food shortages. More than 600,000 people need food aid; 17 people starved to death in September alone, according to government statistics.

Then, while we were preparing for your visit, the El Nino rains arrived, upending the agricultural calendar and bringing with them an outbreak of cholera. The Ministry of Health warns that bilharzia and typhoid may not be far behind. The country is bracing for landslides; more than 100,000 Ugandas are at risk, particularly people living in slums. Here in Kampala, floods have already become an everyday occurrence.

The floods are made worse by greed and our own human actions. Construction projects -- some legal, some not -- impede the flow of water and alter the wetland systems that should provide drainage, while so-called 'investors' erect huge concrete shopping malls all over the city.