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GCAP's plans for COP 21 in Paris


This year marks the deadline for world leaders to reach a new agreement in order to keep global warming below 2°C. Negotiations took place in over the last months and will peak in Paris at the 21st Conference of the Parties, or COP21. The official negotiations take place from November 30th – December 12th. Civil society needs to pressure governments to achieve the already unambitious and insufficient target of  2°C, which is now a greater challenge than ever.

GCAP has published a statement in solidarity and support in light of the recent terrorist attacks. You can find the statement here. But our mobilisation efforts must continue.

Accredited GCAP representatives will be in Paris and will be able to enter the official negotiations spaces. Since the police has cancelled all marches and manifestations in Paris and all over France as well as the main protests which were   which makes our mobilisations across the globe so important to put pressure on national governments to reach a meaningful agreement.

GCAP is an essential part of the mobilisation effort with thousands of activists who are going to mobilise all over the Globe.

Be part of this mobilisation efforts and many coalitions have planned fantastic actions! For example, In Dhaka the capital of Bangladesh marches will be held with the participation of climate victims on 28th and 29th November and with a massive human chain across the city.

As part of the Global Climate March you can register your event and search for the clostest event near you on the weekend of November 29th.

International Civil Society Call to Address Inequalities and Social Justice in Climate Policy

October - November 2015


Socioeconomic inequality is an integral part of the climate crisis, and must be addressed. Climate change disproportionately impacts poor and marginalized people and communities, who suffer climate impacts more severely, do not have the resources to respond or adapt, and lack the resources and influence to demand necessary changes. Climate change particularly impacts women and girls. Climate change is also a factor in the migration crisis. Climate change hurts the poor or marginalized more than the rich, compounding existing inequalities.

Inequality is a key driver of the climate crisis. Inequality lies at the root of unsustainable behaviors. Inequality makes it socially acceptable for some people to have far more than others, and ties consumption to social status, promoting over-consumption. Our economic system also drives the climate crisis, as growth, short-term incentives and profit motives systematically contradict sustainability.

Inequalities, both within and among nations, block agreements and pathways that could lead to sustainability. Within nations, socioeconomic inequalities reduce cultural diversity, depriving societies of potential models for more sustainable ways of life. Overwhelmed with problems caused by inequalities, societies cannot turn their energy towards the transition to sustainability. Between communities and nations who do not share common interests and responsibilities, agreement to address climate change is unlikely to be found. Socioeconomic inequality, by eroding trust and creating social fragmentation, blocks cooperation and joint problem-solving.

CSO open letter to Vice-President Timmermans on the 2030 Agenda

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development


Image of letter


Dear First Vice-President Timmermans, We, European Civil Society Organisations working on both international and domestic EU policies across a variety of sectors ranging from Youth, Sustainability, Social Justice, Fair Trade, International cooperation, Health, Culture, Environment, Gender Equality, Migration, Climate Change, Local Democracy, Human Rights and Media Development, are writing to you in your capacity as Vice-President of the European Commission, mandated with the horizontal responsibility for sustainable development.

At the UN Summit in New York taking place from 25-27 of September, Heads of State and Government will adopt the universal, people- and planet-centered 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (‘Agenda 2030’). As European civil society, we now expect the EU to match the ambition of this Agenda with a clear EU implementation strategy, which reflects the integrated, interlinked and comprehensive nature of the Agenda, in order to ensure well-being for all within planetary boundaries.

We welcome the mapping exercise that you have initiated within the Commission to analyse where the EU has appropriate policies in place to implement Agenda 2030 and where there are gaps. This exercise is a first important step in order to elaborate an EU strategy to implement Agenda 2030. The EU strategy must build on your mapping exercise and cover all Goals and targets of the Agenda.

GCAP response to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA)


While we welcome the objective of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA) of achieving ‘equitable global economic system in which no country or person is left behind’ in its introductory paragraph, so also the mention of the productive employment, decent work and the social protection system, we fear that they may remain as mere rhetoric. While promising to end hunger, poverty and inequality, it has not addressed the structural aspects of the economy responsible for perpetuation of the same. Excessive importance given to the private capital for financing development legitimises the ongoing withdrawal of the state from providing essential services like education, health, water and sanitation and other sectors. While the PPP model has made quality education and health care almost out of reach for the people living in poverty and socially excluded groups, reposing faith on the same model for financing key social sectors reflects serious lack of commitment by the global leaders towards equality, justice and climate change. The question will always remain on how to ensure accountability of private funding to the people at large and of the private capital towards human rights, labour rights and safeguarding the environment.

Click here for full statement.


For the CSO Response to FfD, click here.

May Mobilisation Images


GCAP Reactive on Zero Draft on Post 2015


Well begun but half done: Zero draft of the post-2015 outcome document has best of intentions yet many gaps on things that matter

Human rights are not only violated by terrorism, repression or assassination, but also by unfair economic structures that creates huge inequalities.  -Pope Francis

Climate justice, All Ages and Sexual and Reproductive Rights - May Mobilisations continue


17 May – Faith Climate Action

This day marked the launch of Yeb Sano former Filippino climate ambassador´s People’s Pilgrimage beginning in his homecity of Tacloban, which was ground zero of 2013 Typhoon Haiyan. Over the next few months he will walk thousands of kilometre visiting climate affected communities and culminating in Paris of the COP21 talks,

"We are going to send a powerful, loud message to world leaders that we are many, and we care about the governments and industries of the world finding a solution to the climate crisis," he said "What we want is a just, equitable, ambitious and durable climate agreement to be forged in Paris."

18 May- World leaders to measure up to our ambition

This day of action took part at the start crucial SDG negotiations at the UN in New York 18-22 May. Across action/2015 we sent messages through letters, postcards and tweets letting them know that millions of people are taking action and demanding that they measure up to our ambition and set up a robust system to ensure progress towards a better future for our people and our planet.

22 May All Ages Day

From Labour Rights to Citizen Participation - the first 16 days of May Mobilisations

01 May - Socially Excluded Groups and Labour Rights

Lead by the GCAP Socially Excluded Task Force the day saw women and men workers from dalit, adivasis and other excluded communities across India take to the streets to demand decent work and a dignified wage.  People on the ground and online created a unified chain linking fingers and calling for an ambitious SDG to stop discrimination and ensure equality in work spaces, dignified work and a decent wage for all by 2030.







Actions also took place in Ghana, Pakistan, Kenya and Costa Rica Very exciting news came from action/2015 Kenya where the President agreed on a 12% Pay Increase for workers!

“The present system of governance has made labourer and working class vulnerable even though the wealth of the nation was built on the theft of their land and from their work in the farms, mines and factories,” said Kenneth Amoateng of GCAP Ghana during a mobilisation event in Accra, “The time has come for politicians to talk to the labourer and working class openly and honestly to ensure the enhancement of the dignity of the Ghanaian labour force.”