Home > GCAP Asia

GCAP India

India Action Blog

  • action/2015|Blog|GCAP|GCAP India|Global Poverty|India|poverty
    11/01/2016 - 08:25 | Contributor | 0comments

    The ‘International Day for the Eradication of Poverty’ is very important for GCAP as it aligns with our global strategy and objective. The new GCAP with a renewed mandate commits itself to work towards not only eradicating poverty but to also fight rising inequality with new vigour and commitment.The presence of poverty, insecurity and inequalities continues to be a scandal in a world where knowledge and resources exist to ensure healthy and dignified lives for all.  While a few consume in an extremely unsustainable manner and accumulate soaring wealth, billions of others have no access to adequate food, safe drinking water, proper sanitation, housing, health, education, security and justice.Women, children and socially excluded people still comprise the vast majority of people living in poverty and face harsh discrimination - and often violence - on a daily basis.  It is also worrying that women lack economic empowerment and social protection and continue to live in a context that places them in a situation of vulnerability to violence patriarchy both in home and in society. Furthermore, today, marginalization is seen everywhere – from the poorest to the richest countries. Large-scale migration, displacements and the sharp increase in the number of refugees - resulting from poverty, conflicts and environmental degradation - is an alarming result of these trends. 

  • action/2015|action/land 2015|action/nutrition 2015|Asia|India|land rights|NACDOR|News|property rights
    10/17/2014 - 12:35 | 0comments

    Some 10,000 Dalits and Adivasis – Indians who are marginalised and socially-excluded due to caste and ethnicity – have rallied in the Umariya district of Madhya Pradesh, India to demand land for the landless.

    Dalits and indigenous Adivasis account for more than 36% of the population in Madhya Pradesh, but they own just 3.6% of the land. Nationally, none of the Millennium Development Goals will be achieved for these groups, which account for some 300 million people or more than a quarter of India's population.

    At rallies on 6 October and 15 October, participants demanded that the government provide five acres of property to landless women and families. They are also calling on officials to place the land titles in the women's names.

    On 15 October, the International Day of Rural Women, activists also met with goverment ministers in the states of Bihar and Jharkhand to present their petitions for land rights.

  • action/2015|action/2015|action/2015 asia|Amitabh Behar|Asia|Beckie Malay|Cambodia|CCC|GCAP|India|Korea|News|Philippines|Youth Ki Awaaz
    09/20/2014 - 12:12 | 0comments
    To mark the 500 day deadline to meet the Millennium Development Goals and adopt a new global Post-2015 agenda, GCAP constituents across Asia gathered in person and online to launch 'iMove for Justice, Peace and Equality', a campaign demanding that leaders at all levels uphold human rights and implement policies that are just, sustainable and transformative.  (Read on to see photos and media coverage.)
     
    In the Philippines, a coalition of civil society organisations highlighted the widening wealth gap amidst growing numbers of landless, homeless, malnourished, uneducated, unemployed and sick people in the country.  
     
    Youth Ki Awaaz anchored a 12-hour tweet-a-thon in India, 90 minutes focused on each MDG.
  • Brazil|BRICS|Chile|G20|GCAP Russia|Heinrich Boell Foundation|India|News|Russia|South Africa|Vitaliy Kartamyshev
    02/28/2014 - 08:01 | 0comments

    The BRICS countries – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – risk losing their international credibility if they don't behave as responsible donors, writes GCAP Russia co-chair Vitaliy Kartamyshev.

    These five countries produce about 20% of the world's economic output and account for a growing percentage of official development assistance. But it's clear that the BRIC have “fewer scruples” about how this aid impacts human rights, democracy, women and ethnic minorities.

    At a minimum, the BRICS should adopt a set of guiding principles to ensure that they do not uphold political regimes that impoverish communities, exploit natural resources and undermine the development prospects of recipient countries.

    In an article originally published by the Heinrich Boell Foundation as part of a series of G20 updates, Kartamyshev also argues that decisions by the BRICS, G20, G8 and other such clubs are poorly understood by the country's citizens and even the media. Civil society networks and movements have a role to play here – through education and adding to the political discourse.

  • Asia|Bihar|Blog|Constituency Group|India|Leave No One Behind|NACDOR|Post 2015
    10/01/2013 - 09:56 | 0comments

    Sona Devi has been to school. But she is an exception, one of the few 'matriculates' in her three million strong Musahar community. Sona Devi , who lives in a village in the Nawada district of Bihar, India, wanted to continue her education, but odds and barriers did not allow her to continue.

    Acute malnutrition is common in Musahar communities and literacy rates are among the lowest in India (less than 10% for women, just 15% for men). The ground water in some villages is contaminated, crippling the inhabitants' bones. Mushahars are socially-excluded Dalits, who live primarily in the Indian states of Bihar, Jharkhand, West Bengal, Odisha and Uttar Pradesh.